Julian Burtons Burstrust

Annual Report 2012/13 . Aboriginal Strategy

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Overview

Health outcomes for Aboriginal people living in remote communities who suffer a burn injury are significantly lower than the general population due to a number of factors, including other health issues (eg diabetes), lack of adequate health facilities and professionals and the distance to specialised health services.

The collaboration with the Royal Adelaide Burns Unit continues to go from strength to strength with three highly successful prevention initiatives being implemented.

Health outcomes for Aboriginal people living in remote communities who suffer a burn injury are significantly lower than the general population due to a number of factors, including other health issues (eg diabetes), lack of adequate health facilities and professionals and the distance to specialised health services. 

The collaboration with the Royal Adelaide Burns Unit continues to go from strength to strength with three highly successful prevention initiatives being implemented.

1. Burns Units of Competencies
Aim: To establish opportunities for Aboriginal people living in remote communities to develop burn and fire prevention knowledge and become burn prevention advocates in their communities. 
The Burns Units of Competencies was developed in collaboration between the Royal Adelaide and Womens and Childrens Hospitals, the Aboriginal Health Coucil of South Australia and facilitated in collaboration with local communities. 
A grant from the Federal Governement and funding support from the SA Government and BHP BiIliiton has enabled  the innaugural program to be facilitated. Ssix Aboriginal Health Workers graduate with the three units of competencies (Prevention, Care and Rehabilitation) as electives in the Aboiginal Health Worker Certificate.
2. National Burn First Aid Education
Correct and timely first aid is imperitive to reduce the severity of a burn – as simple as cool water or 20 minutes can mean the difference between a 600km trip to a burn unit or managing the injury within community.
To support people living in regional and remote Aboriginal communities , a Community Service Announcement(CSA) was developed with the Yalata people to provide education about correct first aiad for burn injury with Gavin Wanganeen (ex AFL footballer) and highly respected elder Mimma Smart as the ‘faces’ of the campaign. The CSA was screened:
through Imparja TV reaching rural and remote parts of SA, NSW, TAS, QLD, WA, ACT, to nearly 100,000 ATSI, and 800,00 non-ATSI viewers
on GEM, GO! and Imparja aired the CSA over 600 times on national television
Internationally the CSA reached some parts of PNG, Fiji, Indonesia and Vanuatu
3. Leading Initiatives with technology 
As a result of the successful collaboration between the Royal Adelaide Hospital and Burns Trust, the RAH have been able to employ a tele-health project officer to investigate the use of video conferencing to improve patient journey and reduce the length of stay for rural and remote burns patients. It is also used for the Aboriginal Burn Program and the Remote Burn Advocates in education and support for managing burns patient care.
Program Partners:
BHPB, State Government, FaHCSIA (Families, Health, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs), Holden Ltd

1. Burns Units of Competencies

Aim: To establish opportunities for Aboriginal people living in remote communities to develop burn and fire prevention knowledge and become burn prevention advocates in their communities. 

The Burns Units of Competencies was developed in collaboration between the Royal Adelaide and Womens and Childrens Hospitals, the Aboriginal Health Coucil of South Australia and facilitated in collaboration with local communities. 

A grant from the Federal Government and funding support from the SA Government and BHP Billiton has enabled the innaugural program to be facilitated. Six Aboriginal Health Workers graduated this year, completing the three units of competencies (Prevention, Care and Rehabilitation) as electives in the Aboiginal Health Worker Certificate.

 

2. National Burn First Aid Education

Correct and timely first aid is imperitive to reduce the severity of a burn – as simple as cool water for 20 minutes can mean the difference between a 600km trip to a burn unit or managing the injury within community.

To support people living in regional and remote Aboriginal communities , a Community Service Announcement (CSA) was developed with the Yalata people to provide education about correct first aid for burn injury with Gavin Wanganeen (ex AFL footballer) and highly respected elder Mimma Smart as the ‘faces’ of the campaign.

The CSA was screened:

  • through Imparja TV reaching rural and remote parts of SA, NSW, TAS, QLD, WA, ACT, to nearly 100,000 ATSI, and 800,000 non-ATSI viewers
  • on GEM, GO! and Imparja aired the CSA over 600 times on national television
  • internationally, reaching some parts of PNG, Fiji, Indonesia and Vanuatu

3. Leading Initiatives with technology 

As a result of the successful collaboration between the Royal Adelaide Hospital and Burns Trust, the RAH have been able to employ a tele-health project officer to investigate the use of video conferencing to improve patient journey and reduce the length of stay for rural and remote burns patients.

The technology is also used for the Aboriginal Burn Program and the Remote Burn Advocates in education and support for managing burns patient care.

 

Program Partners

BHP Billiton, South Australian Government, FaHCSIA (Families, Health, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs), Holden Ltd